BASHO NARROW ROAD TO THE INTERIOR PDF

April 27, 2019 posted by

Here is the most complete single-volume collection of the writings of one of the great luminaries of Asian literature. Basho (–)—who elevated the haiku . to his lucid and engaging translation of Bashō’s greatest achievement, his famed travelogue Narrow Road to the Interior (Oku no Hosomichi). Narrow Road to the Interior By Matsuo Basho. Translated by Sam Hamill. Shambhala Publications: Boston, pp. $ (paperback). addiss_1.

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I decided recently that I wanted to read them, but was unsure which translation to choose there are quite a few. Sunday, January 6, A pretty enjoyable slim little volume, though not a source of any great inspiration for me.

Narrow Road to the Interior by Matsuo Basho | : Books

So are the years that pass by. Paperbackpages. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Even with an excellent introduction, afterword, and footnotes, I have the sense I still missed plenty of double meanings and connotations.

Matsuo Basho’s “Narrow Road” (Oku no Hosomichi)

Still I have always been drawn by wind-blown clouds into dreams of a lifetime of wandering. This one is a treasure because of its size, the paper it’s narroow on, and the design of the pages as well as the inclusion of many screen paintings. Hamill achieves a kind of luminosity of language that I find unparalleled in other translations of this work.

In autumn I returned to my cottage on the river and swept away the cobwebs. The silence was profound. This mix of comic with melancholy produces the following:. Ultimately, though, words fail to capture everything from any experience, or fail to adequately describe all the wonder of the world, even though that does not keep Basho from trying himself and calling to mind his predecessors who tried to do so. The opening paragraph of The Narrow Road is famous and is rad presenting in its entirety: I barely had time to sweep the cobwebs from my broken house on the River Sumida before the New Year, but no sooner had the spring mist begun to rise over the field than I wanted to be on the road again to cross the barrier-gate of Shirakawa in due time.

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And many are the men of old who have perished as they journeyed.

It meant a few miles extra, doubling back toward Obanazawa to find shelter. Only last autumn, after having drifted along the seashore for a time, had I swept away the old cobwebs from my dilapidated riverside hermitage. They mean bad diner food, strange motel beds, and highly questionable rest stop bathrooms.

I returned to my hut on the riverbank last autumn, and by the time I had swept away the cobwebs, the year was over. The ‘interior’ here is not only the ‘interior’ of Japan, the essence of so much of its history, but into the ‘interior’ of a man who is fully alive only in the immediate, the simple, the natural world. These fellow travelers start to feel like friends.

The Narrow Road to the Interior (Basho 1644 – 1694)

This awareness of the evanescence of the world of the senses, and its beauty is strong in Japanese culture. The Basho haiku that transcend cultures, the ones about nature, are exquisite. Read it Forward Read it first. Many of the orad of old died on the road, and I too for years past have been stirred by the sight of a solitary cloud drifting with the wind to ceaseless thoughts of roaming.

The travel log, itself seems interesting, but hard to picture and it simply a list of pla I am not sure if this story would be better in print or better if I had a printed copy to see as I listened along.

Drifting life interiot on a boat or meeting age leading a horse by the mouth, each day is a journey and the journey itself home. It is also like cutting a ripe watermelon with a sharp knife or like taking a large bite at a pear.

This was one of my first forays into Japanese literature, and won’t be the last. View all 5 comments. I appreciate simple pleasures, like watching the birds, seeing different landscapes, exploring the strange offerings of convenience stores in foreign states. The spirits of raod road beckoned me, and I could not concentrate on bsaho. At the conclusion of his journey from Edo Tokyo to the north, and back again, he spent five years refining and completing the work for publication.

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Narrow Road to the Interior: And Other Writings

I am a poet and try to write haiku, sometimes I succeed but often I forget the elements required. In autumn I returned to my cottage on the river and swept away the cobwebs.

Some of the poems are incredibly beautiful but the book as a whole left me feeling like I was missing so much more. He is an influential poet in his own right. The oak’s nobility– indifferent to flowers– or so it appears. I read the first section in all of them and this one, by Tthe Hamill, was my favorite by far.

I patched my torn trousers and changed the cord on my bamboo hat. I’ll read it again if for no other reason than it’s a joy to hold in your hands.

My possessions are few and fit in a duffel bag.

Many in the past also died while traveling. Even the years wander on.

Jan 31, JJ Lehmann rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Only last year, I had been wandering along the coasts and bays; and in the autumn I swept away the cobwebs from my tumbledown hut on the banks of the Sumida and soon afterwards saw the old year out.

Read as part of my Nature Literature reading group. At first this may not make sense. This book is part of the Shambhala Pocket Library series. Hamill Ultimately, though, words fail to capture everything from any experience, or fail to adequately describe all the wonder of the world, even though that does not keep Basho from trying himself and calling to mind his predecessors who tried to do so.

The moon and the sun are eternal travelers. There are no discussion topics on this book yet.